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Hey Coach, Who's Your Coach?

Ned Arick, M.S.

You put your entire being into the success of your athletes. You focus on their needs, their aspirations, their goals. Pay attention to the smallest detail in every movement and even every aspect of their life in and out of your facility.

You're there every step of the way, through thick and thin, through good and bad, success and failure. You're the person they come to when they want to get better, in sport and in life.

So let me ask you. Who does that for you? Who do you go to when you need to get better?

I speak with a lot of coaches day in and day out, and unfortunately not many have a "head coach" in their life.

Sure they have those around them that help them coach, but I'm talking about someone that helps write your life programming, holds you accountable to your needs, dreams and aspirations, and pays attention the smallest detail in every season of your life.

Do you have someone that is there for you the way you're there for your athletes?

Coaching can be a lonely journey, and it is vitally important that you have someone to go to along the way.

Below I’ve listed the 5 reasons why you should consider getting a "Performance Coach" in your life.

1. Outside perspective

Coaching involves your entire being - this is your world, it's your life. Because of this, it can be extremely difficult to avoid getting caught in the weeds of your daily routine. Utilizing the perspective of an objective third party can help you stay on top of all the aspects of your life: Your body, your being, your balance and your business.

2. Work-life balance

I know this isn't supposed to be a thing in our industry but a coach can help you stay accountable to a healthy work - life balance. Coaches often work long hours, putting others before their family and not taking enough personal time for themselves. Sometimes you need someone from the outside to take a good look at your situation and point at the unnecessary aspects in your day to day and tell you when and what to say no to.

3. Guidance through your unique situation

Every coach is different. A new coach will have different problems than a coach of 20 years. So find someone who can guide you through your unique situation. Growth through the years is exciting, but it certainly comes with challenges. These are probably similar challenges other coaches have gone through. Find someone who can help you stay grounded in exciting times and point you in the right direction during the difficult ones.

4. Learning from others’ experience

Being a coach can be a lonely profession, although you're surrounded by so many people. Learning from your peers is essential to growth. Find a coach who has been in your place before and can tell you whether you are on target, getting ahead of yourself, or falling behind. You don't have to rewrite the book, do some R&D instead and rip-off and duplicate from a person who has been in your shoes before.

5. Avoiding burnout

The stress of this profession can lead many to burnout. Coaches feel pressure from everyone to be a "Perfect" coach, and as we all know that is simply unattainable. Sometimes they will try and do more and more and end up not doing enough outside of their facility or program. A coach will help you stay focused on what matters, and sometimes that's spending a day with family and friends.

So coach, who's your coach? I'm sure you've got someone in mind by now.

Go call them and hire them onto your life staff. You'll thank yourself that you did.

To your success.

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